I Love It When a Plan Comes Together

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Imagine a half-dozen or so college students in hip boots, brandishing wide nets and paper punches, invading your quiet, secure home. Fortunately, fish don’t think much at all, so the fish in the woodland pond that my ecology class visited back in 1963 probably don’t recall our visit to their ancestors, but I still do.

We set out to calculate the number of fish in the pond. The method required catching and counting a sample of fish, hence the nets. Then we marked them with a small, neatly punched hole in the thin membrane of their tails and carefully released the known number of marked fish (= M1) with detailed instructions to go and mix-and-mingle with their companions for a week. (Indicator dilution, for you purists.)

One week later, back in the hip boots, we netted a new sample and counted those with (=M2) and without (=M0) tail punch marks. With this much information, we could calculate the number of fish in the pond:
If x = number of fish in pond
Then M1/X = M2/M0 and the rest is algebra.
This was my favorite experiment in all my academic experience. Imagine getting OUTSIDE in HIP BOOTS and doing something scientific. Like a stonefly emerging from the depths of the library, I turned into an environmentalist.

Stay with me for just a few more minutes. As an almost-ten-year-old growing up in northeast Ohio, I remember the November 1952 picture of the Cuyahoga River on fire that ended up in Time Magazine a month later – a truly arresting image showing flames leaping up from the water, completely engulfing a ship. Over the years, as a physician, I’ve followed the stories of various health problems that seem to have had roots in the environment; Dan Fagin’s Toms River is one of the best. A few years ago, I first read Steven Johnson’s marvelous book, The Ghost Map, the story of John Snow and the London cholera epidemic of 1854.

Then, just this morning, I had a real “Ah-ha!” moment. I read Margaret Talbot’s New Yorker article (The New Yorker, April 2, 2018), “Scott Pruitt’s Dirty Politics,” and my son David, an environmental economist, sent me a piece from the American Public Health Association on environmental health.
“Many communities lack access to nutritious, affordable food; are denied safe           places to walk and exercise; or live near polluting factories. The health risks for these families are greater. We support research and action to help ensure healthy environments for all.”–APHA Executive Director Georges Benjamin

All of these issues are related. It all comes together!

We are not separate from the environment. In populated areas, we ARE the environment, or at least, the environment is largely man-made.

Some individuals with political power do not seem to understand the connection between environmental health —clean air, clean water, open spaces— and human health. Those individuals will not be swayed by facts. In fact, they actively reject science as a basis for public policy.

For now, we can support the public organizations that do battle on behalf of the environment, particularly those that wage their battles in the courts. And soon, we can, we should, we must…VOTE.

PS: The photo this month is an outhouse in the Chinese section of Arrowtown, New Zealand. The Chinese, who came to New Zealand as gold miners, were keenly aware of the importance of sanitation.

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