How Often Do You Pull Out the Map?


The photo above, taken on our recent visit to New Zealand, illustrates an irrevocable commitment. We did not explore this particular activity, bungee jumping, at any level deeper that photography!

This week, The Packet has arrived with two items, both well-seasoned, about leadership and learning.

Here’s some news from 1898. At the time, William McKinley was the President of the United States, the last president to have served in the Civil War.

On May 1, 1898, Commodore George Dewey led a United States Navy fleet to victory in the Battle of Manila Bay, in the Spanish-American War. In the words of Robert Merry, author of a recent, well-received biography of McKinley, Dewey’s victory “brought forth a kind of serendipitous imperialism.”

As a result of a very short conflict, the United States had gained control of Puerto Rico in the Caribbean, and Guam and the Philippines in the Pacific, and annexed Hawaii as well.

To continue Merry’s story, “The president, it was said, began his education on the Philippines by tearing a small map from a schoolbook, and when a government official arrived with more detailed charts he received them avidly while acknowledging his limited knowledge. ‘It is evident,’ he said, ‘that I must learn a great deal of geography in this war.’”

My point? McKinley had enlisted in the Union Army as a private; he attained the rank of brevet major. Before he was elected president, he had served in Congress, and as the governor of Ohio. Faced with the sudden, unexpected turn of events that transpired in the Pacific, what did he do? He immediately set out to educate himself.

That’s what leaders do; they look for information.

Fast forward to the New York Times Magazine of October 12, 2010. In a piece by Peter Baker titled “Education of a President, Baker says, “To better understand history, and his role in it, Obama invited a group of presidential scholars to dinner in May in the living quarters of the White House. Obama was curious about, among other things, the Tea Party movement. Were there precedents for this sort of backlash against the establishment? What sparked them and how did they shape American politics? The historians recalled the Know-Nothings in the 1850s, the Populists in the 1890s and Father Charles Coughlin in the 1930s. “He listened,” the historian H. W. Brands told me. “What he concluded, I don’t know.”

The two items span 112 years. There’s not much recently.

Come back soon for more photos of New Zealand.