Cold nights are coming. Curl up with a good book

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The Amherst gymnasium, the site of JFK’s last speech.

 

Although Paul Dimond’s novel, The Belle of Two Arbors, appeared in April of this year, the epic story begins in the early twentieth century. Based on the temporal setting, the Weekly Packet can bring it to your attention without violating the underlying principle of reporting well-seasoned news.

I’ve just finished reading the 800-plus page story. I will admit that I am a “story” reader, not an “ear reader.” I skimmed lightly over many of the poems that Martha Buhr Grimes contributed to the novel in the guise of Belle, the central character.

Set primarily in what is now northwestern Michigan’s Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and in Ann Arbor, Dimond has constructed a rich story line with a dynamic female protagonist, a complex and powerful family, three world-famous poets – Frost, Roethke, and Auden – and the academic politics of two great American institutions, the University of Michigan and Amherst College.

The 200 to 250-page novel has become fashionable in recent fiction. Dimond’s 800-page story reminded me of Annie Proulx’s Barkskins. Both authors have created complex and fascinating families and followed them through generations. In both books, the author’s passionate commitment to the environment infuses the story, and each writer addresses the injustices done to native Americans.

The story of Belle and her family makes for the old-fashioned reading experience than I enjoy most: curling up in a big leather chair with a lap-blanket and escaping to another world for an hour or two in the evening as the story unfolds. Immerse yourself in it, and reap the rich rewards.

The author, Paul Dimond, is an Ann Arbor lawyer and writer, and an Amherst alumnus, Class of 1966. He, too, was in the audience in October, 1963 when President Kennedy spoke about poetry and power at the dedication of Amherst’s Robert Frost Library. Like many who heard that speech, Paul credits it with a long-lasting impact on his life and his career.

A fifty-four-year retrospective assessment of the impact of a single speech on a single day is fraught with hazard. The possibility of overweighting JFK’s words in the balance of long-ago decisions certainly exists. Nonetheless, I urge you to read The Belle of Two Arbors. As you enjoy the story, you’ll be amazed by the depth of Paul’s research and the clarity of his values. Surely with this sustained creative work, he has honored Kennedy’s proposition that, “art establishes the basic human truths which must serve as the touchstone of our judgement.”

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