“Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.” ― Groucho Marx

About a year ago, two reviews of Annie Proulx’s novel, Barkskins, appeared in the New York Times. Neither was particularly favorable.

I bought an audiobook recording of the novel and have listened to it, all 26 hours of it, while driving up and down I-75 from Ann Arbor to the Upper Peninsula. I finished the last disc a few days ago driving west on M-28.

Two of Proulx’s previous works, The Shipping News and Brokeback Mountain, have won a Pultizer Prize and a National Book Award. Barkskins probably won’t scale those heights. Nonetheless, the book appealed to me at several levels.

First, Proulx is now over 80, and any octogenarian who has the dedication and energy to write and publish a 717 page novel spanning 300 years is OK in my estimation. Second, the tale is a prolonged, slowly intensifying, protest against the wholesale exploitation of natural resources for corporate profits. It’s a protest that might be more effective at a fraction of the length, but it certainly conveys the intensity of her feeling. At this stage of life, having intense feelings about issues seems to me extraordinarily admirable. And from time to time, she delivers positively lyrical descriptions.

Finally, though, I was drawn to her failure to get the story ended. I’m sure we have all sat through to one or another piece of classical music in which the audience raises its’ collective arms, ready to applaud and get the damn thing over with, only to have the orchestra continue on, repeatedly swelling toward but not achieving a grand finale. In the last chapters of Barkskins, Proulx just can’t stop the music.

Most stories often have natural endings. The detective solves the crime. The traveler returns home. The horse wins the race. But Barkskins won’t end for Annie.

I find that appealing. She doesn’t want to hang it up, to say, “There, that’s all I have to say about that.” Good for her!

I don’t think many Weekly Packet visitors will head to the local bookstore to buy this very long novel. You just won’t have time to read it. So, here’s an offer you can’t refuse. Anyone who is facing a long drive, for instance, New York to Los Angeles by way of New Orleans, can let me know. I’ll send the audiobook to the first reader I hear from. You’ll enjoy it.

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