Aargh! By AARP

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have several medical journals open on my desk with interesting topics that I thought I might mention in “The Weekly Packet.” By and large, the open journals are now properly aged, like pieces of meat at a fine steakhouse.

Nonetheless, they will have to wait. The most comment-worthy item to come along this week was in the AARP weekly flimsy.  Painful truth: my wife and I joined AARP to get the substantial discount offered by our local optometrist’s shop on new glasses. Even more painful truth: I was pulled in by the headlines about “why do drugs cost so much?”

I did not have high hope for a rigorous exegesis in the AARP journal, but the presentation was actually quite balanced. The writers covered the long timelines from drug discovery through clinical trials and the FDA approval process, and even covered phase 4 studies. They also touched on the vast amount that “big pharma” spends on marketing. In all fairness, they at least mentioned that Medicare cannot, by law, negotiate drug prices and touched on the strange role that “pharmacy benefit managers” play in the US system.

What’s my point? An AARP member who actually spent some time carefully reading the article would have a basic vocabulary, would become familiar with some of the players in the market, and would have been introduced to two key facts: pharmaceutical costs are only about 10% of overall health care costs, and big pharma spends as much on marketing as on basic research. Not bad. Although the authors did not point out to their readers that without this industry, their diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cancers could not be treated.

More importantly, what the AARP reader would NOT know, struck me last week when I attended the Clinical Leader Forum in Philadelphia. The pharmaceutical industry, particularly the clinical research organizations that have proliferated in the past couple of decades, exemplifies the new economy.

Let me try to explain. In one lifetime, mine, pharmacology has gone from a collection of empiric facts about medicinally useful herbs like digitalis or compounds, like sulfa, to an integrative science and technology focused on identifying “drug targets” in pathophysiologic processes.

From this point of view, the new drugs that pharma generates are the physical tokens, the representation of knowledge and of enormous amounts of data. The patients are not really paying for the drugs, they’re paying for the data. I think eventually, we will work out something more functional for drug pricing. But take a step back, and look again.

Kids who under-achieve academically will not find jobs in this industry. What I saw during last week’s meeting was a relentlessly driven technological and sociological wedge splitting the workforce into those who could deal with complexity and those who could not.

And I’m sure that other industries are similar.

There is no going back. No matter how much we would like to idealize the post-WWII economy, it’s gone.

Here’s the really scary thing; there’s good evidence most AARP members don’t understand what this kind of industry means for our society.

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